Are you like your mother?

May 3, 2016

 

 

With mother’s day coming up this weekend, we should not only try and make the day as special as possible for our mums, I think it’s also important to check in and reflect on how similar we are to each other.
Have we followed in our mother’s footsteps?

 

There may be a number of things where we are really proud to say that this particular quality is similar to mums’ or that trait has been passed down to me by my mum, but there will also be times where we might cringe and think ‘oh dear…I am exactly like my mother!’

 

What is it exactly about your mum that you admire and aspire to be like?
Or..
What traits of hers do you no longer want and how can you change them?

 

There are some that will be easy to change and some that are hard. Personality and behavioural traits are often ingrained in us and changing these traits, if necessary, will require a lot of conscious effort and patience. Reminding yourself of how to act or how to not react to certain things can be challenging.

 

Habits and interests are a bit easier to change, but motivation and determination must be maintained at all times.

 

What habits or interests have you acquired from your mum?

 

What do you want to pass down to your children?

 

What habits do you want to leave at the front door?

 

When it comes to health and fitness, our mum’s play an integral part in how we perceive ourselves and what our attitude is towards our own health. Now I don’t mean just because your mum isn’t healthy and fit that you aren’t either, nor do I mean the opposite.

 

In some cases we might have sub-consciously decided that whatever belief our mother, (intentionally or unintentionally), tried to establish within us, we actually ended up doing the opposite. As children we rebel, sometimes for the good and sometimes for the bad. I know with my mum, she was always encouraging me to do sport and to dance. She knew I needed these to keep me out of trouble.

 

I was rebellious. So by the time I was 15 years old, I had enough bad attitude to be able to tell my mum that I was no longer going to play netball, nor would I continue to dance. All she could do is look at me helplessly and watch me get up to no good.

 

Almost 18 years later I look back and wished I hadn’t been so stubborn. I wish I had kept up dancing, something I was good at; something that made me feel free and happy.

 

Rather than regret what we wished we had done or wished we hadn’t, let’s take this opportunity this Mother’s Day to thank our mum’s for the positive influences they’ve tried to ingrain in us, in regards to our fitness and health.

 

How can we embrace this more?
Or…
What bad influence has mum been when it comes to our health and fitness and what attitudes and habits do we no longer want to have?

 

What habits do you not want to pass on to your children?

 

How can you thank her for being exactly what you don’t want to be when it comes to health and fitness?
Because of her you are now wiser…

 

My mother tried to get me to lead a fit and healthy lifestyle. Although I no longer dance, I do stay out of trouble and have acquired those positive habits she tried to ingrain in me at a young age. It took me a while to fall back in love with fitness, but now that I have, it's a habit that will be very hard to break. Fitness for me is an outlet like dancing was, a way to exert any frustration I may have. It’s a time when I’m free. I don’t think or care about anything…I mean how can you when your butt is burning and you are out of breath?
I thank my mother for this.

 

So, how will you be thanking your mum this Mother’s Day?

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